Convex mirrors on cars

The design rules that apply for vehicles sold in Australia are always being updated and the design rules for mirrors on motor vehicles were changed a while ago to adopt the European rules, which allow a choice of either flat or convex mirrors on both sides of the vehicle.

Convex mirrors are curved mirrors that give a “compressed” view rather than a flat view. As a result, they cover a wider field of view and objects in the mirror appear smaller. This minimises blind spots but also creates the illusion that things in the mirror are further away.

These mirrors can take a little bit of getting used to, especially for those used to flat mirrors – but it is just a matter of becoming familiar with the characteristics of a convex mirror.

Convex mirrors have been fitted to the passenger side of vehicles in Australia for many years, sometimes accompanied by the warning “Objects in mirror may be closer than they appear”, with no evidence that they cause a safety problem. These types of mirrors have also been in use overseas for many years and we are not aware of any reports of increased crash risk due to their use.

The RTA Road Users’ Handbook states that “before you change lanes, give your signal in plenty of time, check your mirrors and look over your shoulder for other vehicles”. The “head check” is necessary to ensure it is safe to change lanes – drivers should not depend on their mirrors alone.

Convex mirrors are becoming more common on new cars and it is likely they will soon be standard across the market. So, when purchasing a new or used vehicle, be sure to read the vehicle owner’s handbook to become familiar with the operating aspects of the vehicle and the equipment fitted.

Have you driven a vehicle with convex mirrors on both sides? Do you find convex mirrors safer or more dangerous?

87 thoughts on “Convex mirrors on cars

  1. Convex mirrors give a wider view and they do take getting used to. It is no different to when they were introduced on the left hand mirror, everyone kicked up a fuss, but now they are used to them, there is no problem, same will go for the right hand mirror, so stop whinging and get used to it.

    • It’s fine to say get used to it. But how can anyone get used to making guesses to how far the vehicle behind really is. It’s also worth noting that with modern vehicles head checks are much harder to achieve clear view. Most modern vehicles with it’s high seats and head rest, coupled with smaller and higher rear wind screen, it’s almost impossible to see anything worthwhile when doing a head check. Give me the flat mirrors anytime, ever since I have been driving with the convex mirrors I have at times had to stop rather than taking the chance to merge, simply because I was unable to judge the distance. Convex mirrors might work overseas, where drivers allow others to cut in when they see an indicator flashing, but in Melbourne, where the opposite happens, that is, they accelerate to stop you from changing lanes it does not work.

  2. Being one that constantly uses mirrors and likes to be very aware of my surroundings, I find the convex mirrors problematic. One should be able to obtain true distances when using mirrors so as to ensure the correct decision is made when negotiating a move. I have cut too many drivers off be relying on the incorrect reading I receive from these mirrors.
    Also I obtain a different perspective from my rear vision mirror which can be disconcerting when needing to negotiate my position in heavy traffic.

    I hate them.

    • I agree totally. I find the convex mirrors most disconcerting and makes me nervous every time I wish to change lanes. Can we choose to go back to the old ones?

    • I recently had my mirrors changed to flat glass. Search mirrors 4 cars and call the 1300 number. Pete will explain how to pop the mirrors out, and where to send them. I had mine back in 3 days .Alternativly he will send flat glass with instructional video .

  3. I recently hired a car which used a convex drivers side mirror – I found it quite disconcerting, my brain wasn’t expecting the view I saw and my eyes had to adjust their focus to the different view. I’m sure I would get used to it if I was able to use the car regularly though.

    I didn’t really have an opportunity to consider whether the view was better from the convex mirror. Next time I hire a similar car, I’ll pay more attention to the mirrors.

  4. I was test driving a new car on the weekend & found myself in a merge lane, I put on the blinker, checked my mirror – yes there is a ute coming up – then glanced over my shoulder, “Holy Sh…” the ute towing a boat trailer was right in the usual cars blind spot. From the mirror it looked like he was behind the boot but he was level with the back seat. I was running out of room & he would not back off so I had to break to a crawl & wait for him to pass. I took the car back to the dealer & told him what happened. “oh yeh, objects in the rear view mirrow appear closer then they are” – thanks for the heads up first “Buddy” – I did not buy the car :)

  5. What’s cracking. Yeah something needs to be done to these mirrors. They are good in theory but in practice they can be deceiving. I still prefer to look over my shoulders. Happy days…

  6. I’ve had a mondeo for about 2 years now which goes one step further, 60% of the mirror is flat, with the outer edge (seperated by a visibile line) being convex. I find theyre the best mirrors i have ever had in a motor vehicle as it gives you correct aspects for most angles, and yet i can see 90% of the blindspot in the convex section.
    It frustrates me driving cars without this now

  7. I have done a lot of thinking on this, and my problem is three-fold.
    1. If side mirrors are placed so that they show the lane next to you, and not just repeat the view in the rear-vision mirror, then the blind spot problem is eliminated.
    2. I believe that turning the head around is dangerous – why remove the field of vision away from the front, when you really don’t need to!
    3. I agree with the thought that THERE SHOULD BE NO DISTORTION in any mirror, as it defeats the purpose. As a completely cynical thought, why not design a mirror so convex that it shows a full 360degress, then you’ll see everything around you and all traffic will be a thousand miles away!!

  8. Seven months ago, I traded in my old Ford Corsair (aka Nissan Pintara with Ford badges) which had flat side mirrors, on a Hyundai Getz which has convex mirrors on both sides. It took a lot of mental adjustment to compensate for the fact that a vehicle almost level with mine appears to be quite a long way back. I’m still extra cautious about changing lanes if I can see anything in either mirror.

    In the Ford I almost never looked at the passenger side mirror and turned my head to check that it was clear to move to the left (a habit learned from many years of motorcycling).

    Unfortunately the Getz has much worse blind spots and I’ve found that it’s essential to look at the passenger side mirror before thinking of moving into the left lane. The problem is similar though not quite as bad with the right-hand mirror. So I’ve become dependent on looking at the side mirrors to fill in the blind spots, but I won’t change lanes unless I can easily see the front of vehicles behind me in the other lane, in the main rear vision mirror. And unlike most drivers, I signal what I’m going to do in plenty of time before I do it.

  9. i just can’t work out what you lot are whinging about. If you’re not clever enough to work out where the other cars are in your convex mirrors, just look over your shoulders like you used to have to do when you had flat mirrors, dohh!!!

    • But at least you could tell from the mirrors where the cars were. Yes it’s all very well to look over your shoulder, but I would think you need to have an accurate indication from all sources of vision. I cannot get my eyes to adjust to the mirrors at all – after driving a Toyota Camry for three years, my eyes still see double of everything in the mirror (perhaps because of my glasses) so I simply avoid using it as much as I can. I use the inernal mirror and over the shoulder all the time because of the inaccuracy of the information I get from these dreadful mirrors. Please bring back the flat ones again!

  10. My husband’s work car is convex mirrored, he drives it daily even so after months of getting use to it, it still caused him to have an accident by missjudging the distance of the car in the next lane. I can’t get use to them at all they are dangerous bring back the “Normal” mirrors.

  11. I don’t consider these mirrors aid a safer view of the rear, their wide angle
    view encourages lazy drivers to not do a head check and they give a false view of the gap to the vehicle behind in the adjacent lane when you are merging. When I took delivery of my new car some months ago I immediately took it to a glazier who cut and silicon-glued plain glass mirrors over the convex glass. He said he has a large collection of templates for all makes of cars and does a roaring trade.

  12. People. Stop complaining. You don’t have any problems with the left hand convex mirror, do you? So as it is stated, it will take time to adjust. maybe other aspects of your driving should be looked at also. As Bruce said, “look over your shoulder” and do a head check….Don’t be so lazy!!!!

  13. Mars, what you state is not necessarily correct. In my new vehicle, like many others, you will find that the two side mirrors are convex while the centre rearvision mirror is plain glass.
    So for a driver who uses his mirrors extensively and at all times likes to be aware of where he is situated in comparison to other vehicles, he will be receiving different readings when using the side mirrors and the centre mirror. This in essence is the problem. If all 3 mirrors were giving the same distance reading then as you state, drivers could get use to them.

    I two had my side mirrors replaced on my late model vehicle with plain glass.

  14. I just bought a brand new Toyota corolla and find the covex side mirrors very dangerous. It does not give you a true position of cars on either side on the road. Turning Rt or Left is extremely dangerous. I met with an accident on the freeway because I did not have the real position of the car on the fast lane.Luckily it was a minor damage to both cars but it could have cost my life.
    Those who are comfortable with these mirrors should be allowed to use them and those who do not trust their lives with these side mirrors should be allowed to change them to normal side mirrors.There should be market for supplying change to mirrors.

  15. Ray, I would like to change the right hand rear vision mirror on my new Honda Civic. Did you use a glazier in Sydney? If so who & where.
    Many thanks

  16. Being very qualified, B-Double Raod Train Licence, Army Drivers Licences(Numerous Bike & Trucks), NSW Police High Speed Cars, Trucks & Buses & Competition Racing Car Licence. I beleive the avaerage car driver is not experienced and intelligent enough to use convex mirrors. They cannot even adjust there mirrors properly , let alone use them. Most lane changing accidents and near accident occur because someone gets cut off , due to not enough room to change lanes, brought about by convex mirros. Convex mirrors are also useless for reversing with trailers/caravans and that is why large trucks only have them as an auxillary/spotting mirror for traffic in their blind spots. They should not be allowed on cars as they are not necessary if you adjust your standard mirror properly.

  17. Nos from Maroubra, If you feel they are so dangerous, show some proof! European’s have been using convex mirrors for donkey’s years and there is no evidence of them being dangerous. I await your comment…

  18. Mars,
    I dont believe I wrote that they are so dangerous as you state. I did write that they are problematic from a personal perspective. I like to receive a true indication of actual distance not one that distorts the image.

    I couldn’t care less if they use convex mirrors in the EU – it doesn’t mean that what is practiced over there is ideal. Look they even drive on the wrong side of the road.

  19. Hullo Ann,
    any glazier anywhere can do it, the glass they use is plain mirror glass.
    You might have to give the glazier a template you cut yourself with some stiffish paper placed over the existing mirror, outline it with a pen, cut with scissors and test the shape to see if it fits neatly.

  20. I think these are a disaster and make it difficult to judge the distance. At night and in the rain at night they are even more difficult to use. They may be OK for people who do not wear glasses. I have a 3 year old car which has these and I am still not comfortable. The only way is to double check by looking over the shoulder or in the internal mirror. Why be distracted by take your eyes off the road in front to look over your shoulder? Why force a double check?
    Looking in mirrors should be VERY simple. You should not have to recompute the distance.
    BTW, I asked about changing the glass at the beginning and was told it was not allowed.

  21. I have to agree 100% with Shaun McGowan about the general level of intelligence of most car drivers not to be trusted with convex mirrors. There definately should be warning for those renting vehicles. It only takes once quick incidence to result in tragedy.

  22. Convex mirrors are a huge problem for the inexperienced driver who believe that what they see in the mirror is reality! How often has a car cut in front in lanes creating a near miss situation or heavy braking all because they thought the car in the other lane was further away!
    It is an absolute rarity to actually see some look over their shoulder! P platers especially don’t seem to have shoulders. This also seems to be the case for older drivers with arthritis or stiff necks!!

  23. Convex mirrors can be a little strange at first when you first use them, but given time you’ll find you can’t go without them. That’s why so many cars are now fitted with them, the benefits of them are obvious.

    Regards,
    Melissa

    • Really, Ive never had any problem with my blind spots and have never actually noticed any benefit in the wider view angle of convex mirrors …..however, I have noticed the reduced ability to estimate distance – even now that I am fairly used to them.

  24. I think these convex mirrors distort the image you are viewing so much so, it makes my head spin. I was test-driving a new vehicle yesterday which was fitted with these ridiculous mirrors and they upset me so much I terminated my test drive. I have been driving for 20 plus years and have never been involved in an accident, so I don’t think my intelligence and ability to drive properly come into question. I think it is simply that I felt terribly uncomfortable relying on these mirrors in order to determine safety in an expensive new car I have not yet purchased!! It almost felt like I was at the Ekka looking into one of those other “silly” mirrors that give out distorted imagery. I have since decided I will not be purchasing this vehicle or any other vehicle that any manufacturers deem necessary to be fitted with this type of circus mirror. No wonder there are so many accidents on the road that are caused by simple miscalculation. If this keeps up, there will be many more to come. I don’t want to be one of the victims. Do you?

  25. For those who think convex mirrors are the go….Just because you can use a convex mirror safely, doesn’t mean the person in the lane next to you can. Half the time is isn’t your own driving you need to be concerned with, it’s the other noong noongs on the road!! When it comes to convex mirrors on cars, I could well be one of the noong noongs!!

  26. My new Honda Civic has what you call convex mirrors. All I know is that my other car stated that “things may appear further that they are” on the left side, and the right hand side has nothing stated on the mirror, meaning normal view, so this is what I was used to.

    I didn’t even notice that my new Honda was any different, (as it doesn’t say that the view is different), until I reversed into a tree which looked like it was quite some distance away. I also refuse to parallel park in it at all.

    Does anyone know if it is law, that you should at least be advised when the view is different??????

  27. They are extremely hard to judge distance, serve no practical function at all and should be banned. A backwards step in raod safety.

  28. Convex mirrors are extremely good on passenger side. I find that it eliminates the blindspot. After I identify the closest vechile in the mirror, I look at rear view mirror to check the distance of the same vechile before changing the lane and it works really well.

    I have an older car with flat mirror on the passenger side and I find it hardly of any use since the coverage is very little.

    All thumbs up for Convex mirrors.

    Thanks

  29. why cannot the manufacturers give you a choice so you can pick plain or convex mirror. I have used both and find that it takes me a little while to get used to a convex mirror – about 15 minutes. give people the choice then the problem disappears.
    a greater safety concern to me is that we cannot have mirrors on the passenger side on the front wing of the car. my early cars were sports cars that had them on the wings both left and right side. it means you don’t have to turn your head much to look at the mirrors to see what is behind you and therefore less risk of something happening in front of you when you are looking to the side. as for these people who odvocate looking over your shoulder while driving at [any] speed – don’t you realise how dangerous that is? looking over your shoulder should be for starting out from a parking spot only.

  30. Our MA Mondeo has the best of both worlds as it combines both flat and convex, but the real issue is that modern cars have woefull rear vision so we need to rely on the mirrors. The Mondeo has poor rear vision so you need a decent mirror, thank heavens they are OK.

    I drove a few other cars being making our choice, and it seems that there is also a great variation in the amount of curvatore in each mirror depending on the model/ manufacturer. One Japanese Model made my wife feel nauseous and the Dealer actually agreed that they do with some people.

    Not at all consistent and not very safety oriented.

    Check Google there is a supplier in Sydney of replacment mirrors that I understand is on the books of more than one Dealership.

  31. Motorcycles have had convex mirrors for years (well, most of them, anyway!). They give a much wider field of view, but nothing- I’ll say that again- NOTHING- takes the place of a “headcheck!”. The headcheck has been part of motorcycle training since I first become an instructor in 1991, and was always strictly enforced on the training range. Pity car drivers were not subject to a similar off road training system. Might nake the roads safer for us motorcyclists, too.

  32. I cannot believe the amount of people on here that don’t look over their shoulder before changing lanes. This is not a new thing. I have held my licence for about 15 years now, and was taught this from day 1 – Mirror, Indicator, Shoulder (MIS). In those 15 years of driving I have never had an accident, or near miss from taking my eyes off the road for about a second to look over my shoulder. I have, however noticed many vehicles in my blindspot, thus avoiding an accident or cutting them off. Maybe this explains why I am cut off by so many people on the road. Have some situational awareness people!

  33. Regarding the comments re not taking your eyes off the road for anything- scanning, or moving your eyes, is a preferred safe driving method. This includes- both sides of the road well ahead; instruments (all of them!); mirrors; and looking as far ahead as possible. Of course, this can not be done safely if you are using your phone, eating or fighting with the kids in the back seat.
    I would like to see positive work done to target the REAL causes of accidents- not just a catch cry (eg. speed kills) that circumvents the truth and is used to justify a new tax.
    By the way- why are counrty drivers being slugged a new tax on our rego to fix the city ratrace when our own roads are in such a mess???

  34. Just bought a “new” car with convex mirrors & find they give an unreal distance perspective. After only driving for 2 days with these I am considering changing them to regular mirrors. I am doing driver training with my 17yr old, (have done 60+ hours in the old car) who said that he couldn’t work out how far cars were from us. His comment is, “I will use the rear vision and turn my head to get better judgement, I don’t want to have an accident”.

  35. I cannot believe the number of drivers who do NOT do the “headcheck” required by LAW.
    I am approaching 70 and have no trouble obeying this LAW. When I find I am unable to do the headcheck I will consider that I am no longer fit to hold a licence and hand it in.
    I am also amazed by the number of people who rely on their mirrors to judge distances. This is folly in the extreme.
    Rear view mirrors are there so that drivers can have an idea of what is happening around them. In this regard I find the mildly convex mirrors far preferable to the old fashioned flat mirrors which left most of “what was around you” in a blind spot.

  36. I done it, I have put unleaded petrol into my diesel Range Rover. It is a bad thing for sure and I did not think it could possible happen to me. I have done 50000 ks in last 8 months so I am refuelling regularly, got distracted after a long day and picked up the wrong nossel (the one beside the diesel). Vehicle under repair not sure what damage has been done , vehicle was not driven but ignition turned on. Thought I was the only special one but two other vehicles in on the same day same problem. With the growing number of diesel arriving on our roads it is only going to get worse.

  37. New Ford Fiesta WS. Bloody ridiculous convex mirror. In America Ford have an inset in the drivers mirror which shows the true distance. Now that makes sense. Anyone found a magnifying type plastic layer that will easily attach to all or a portion of the drivers mirror and correct this dangerous situation. That may be an easy fix?

  38. Convex side mirriors are the most loopy idea to come out of the motoring industry, ever. They serve no purpose whatsoever, unless you call increasing hazards a purpose. What? But…but…they tell you if there’s a car behind and to the side of you, don’t they? Well for heaven’s sake – there’s ALWAYS a car behind and to the side of you! What you need to know is how close it is! The convex mirror tells you the other car is way back there, way out of range, whereas in reality its right on your bumper. I defy anyone to accurately estimate distances with a convex mirror. It simply cannot be done, because our brains haven’t evolved that way.
    What an idiotic idea! What’s next? Spherical lens windscreens for a fish-eye view of the road ahead?

  39. Convex side mirrors are nightmare when backing a large boat you need to know the correst distance.Also dangerour at 100k in heavy traffic when its dark and raining taking your eyes off the road to look over shoulder is not the safest thing to do.

  40. this is for Dirk, somewhere up in the forum. Der! Did you think a car dealer can tell you about every thing before your holliness takes it out on a drive? And a message for all of you out there whinging about mirrors and stuff! A good driver doesn’t even need a side view mirror on the near side and pretty much not even the off side one if you know how to use your main one and look over your shoulder

  41. Dear Dirk…..You obviously don’t drive a Ford Fiesta WS coupe! Look over your shoulder and all you see is pillars. If anyone knows of a source for stick on normal mirrors for this vehicle would you mind posting? I’d need to get them posted as I live at Port Douglas QLD.

  42. MY WIFE PURCHASED A 2010 GETZ ABOUT SIX MONTHS AGO, I HAVE BEEN A PASSANGER MANY TIMES AND HAVE BEEN VERY CRITICAL OF HER HESITANT DRIVING, LAST SATURDAY I DROVE THE CAR FOR THE 1ST TIME, WENT TO REVERSE PARK USING THE SIDE MIRRORS AND NEARLY HIT THE CAR BEHIND.

    DRIVING HOME I WAS QUITE DISMAYED AND FRUSTRATED AT THE DISTANCE SHOWN V TRUE DISTANCE OF UPCOMING TRAFFIC.

    UNTILL I RETIRED A FEW YEARS BACK I WAS ON THE ROAD AS A REP, NONE OF THE CARS I DROVE HAD SUCH DISTORDED SIDE MIRRORS. MY WIFE GOT MY MOST HUMBLE APOLOGIES, HYUNDIA GOT A SERVE.

    MY VECHILE IS A 17FT TRITON 4X4 WITH THE BEST CONVEXE MIRRORS I HAVE EVERY USED .
    RGDS PETER

  43. I have driven many different types of vehicles including heavy rigid ones in my 50 years of having a licence. I have used several types of mirrors – flat, convex, and those with a small convex part to them (these are probably the most useful.) I have found that with spectacles, particularly multifocus lenses, looking at the convex mirror takes a couple of seconds for my eyes to adjust to the different perspective. Apart from the unreal distance problem, this time factor I find is very dangerous as objects are quite out of focus for a short time until my eyes become adjusted to the difference in reality. I cannot see the point in these mirrors at all, as they slow the decision-making ability of the driver down quite considerably. I look in the mirror, then in the internal one and then for good measure over the shoulder. It has simply added another action to passing a vehicle which adds to the danger of driving. I do not even like left hand convex mirrors, but driver’s side ones are really dangerous. At least with flat mirrors you know the distance the following car is from you. Distorted reality at 100 kph is insane.

  44. With 38 yrs of driving and motor cycle riding, if this went to a vote I would vote against these convex mirrors. I’d rather have plain mirrors and look over my shoulder. On a motor cycle you do not have side pillars to block your view when you turn your head to confirm your field of view, and you do not reverse park a motor cycle using your mirrors. All drivers contributing to this forum are obviously concerned enough about safe driving to state their view. If you are comfortable with them and consider them safe, that’s fine. But if not, you should have the option to choose or customise to suit.

  45. regarding convex mirrors on cars i have just brought a new car and i was not told about these mirrors at first i thought my eyes were playing tricks on me as the cars that were following me apeared to be some distance away but in actuall fact they were much closer i fail to see were they are safe as they give false distance imformation to the driver i belive they are unsafe and a step in the wrong direction.

  46. I am a Driving Instructor in the UK. Convex mirrors in my opinion are dangerous. They give a false image and i beleive they cause more accidents than flat glass mirrors. The solution is very simple we need more mirrors. Three mirrors are the optimum amount on each door, all made of flat glass to give a true impression of what you see. All these mirrors should be adjustable. The first mirror should be used to se traffic lanes on either side of the vehicle, The second mirror should be used to see in your blind spot areas, And the third mirror should be used to see the kerb edging on one side and Parking bay lines on both sides. SIMPLE.

  47. Bought a Getz 3-door 18 months ago. Passenger side rear view mirror is an electric type convex mirror with a curved surface. Last week, while being driven along Parramatta Road, the mirror exploded. Mirror glass disappeared and there is what appears to be a carbon deposit around the inside front of the containing cone of the mirror. No dents to front of the containing cone.
    Is this unusual ? Electrical fault ?

  48. I recently bought a VW Polo and have had a truly aggravating time adjusting to the convex mirror. The blind spots in the car are significant, therefore you cannot rely on turning your head to see what is coming up behind as the view is blocked by the body of the car. This makes the convex mirror essential but it gives an entirely false impression of the nearness of a vehicle behind. I am concerned about this situation as there seems to be no way around the problem except buying another car with less severe blind spots.

  49. I find many cars cutting other vehicles off during lane changes. I have observed that cars fitted with curved mirrors are usually the worst offenders as the drivers do not have the correct depth perception due to the cureved mirror giving them a false view as to the position of the car alongside. I do not like using these mirrors especially when reversing trailers. It is much safer using flat mirrors. If I purchase a new vehicle I will make sure that these mirrors are not fitted. I drive a van with limited left side visibility but if you give the other drivers enough warning of lane change intentions then it is not a problem if you have a blind spot which is an issue with most vans and trucks. Whenever I get cutoff by other road users with curved mirrors I make sure with the use of my airhorns that they get the message that they cut me off.

  50. I have a 2008 Elantra which has convex mirrors on both sides. Although there was no warning printed on them I realised pretty early on that they were convex. I just use my rear vision mirror when I want to know the exact distance of the car behind me or coming up in the next lane.

  51. What surprises me most about about the knockers of convex mirrors is that they seem to have missed the point. Convex mirrors eliminate the blind spot. I have a stick on convex mirror and I love it. Before I got it, I was horrified when I consciously measured the time a passing car was in the blind spot before it appeared out of nowhere. I always (now and before the stick on mirror) look over my shoulder. The problem is that there is a huge pillar which obscures my view. Now, after a few days of studying the distortion – by using my rearview mirror as a guide, I feel like I really know what’s going on around me. Having said that, I would much prefer the 60% flat and 40% convex, which seems to offer the best of both worlds. Does anyone know where I can get one?

  52. All cars I’ve ever owned have had flat drivers side mirrors. I drove a new Lancer with a convex drivers mirror and it was ridiculous. Quick glances in the side mirror before a head turn to change lanes were near useless in determaining car positioning, and at some angles two images of cars would be visable at certain distances. In answer to the question, I believe more dangerous, and after 6 months I still can’t get used to it. I can understand convex mirrors on the passenger side to widen the angle, but unnecessary on the drivers side. Will be looking into replacing it with a flat (normal) mirror.

  53. Re: “The “head check” is necessary to ensure it is safe to change lanes – drivers should not depend on their mirrors alone.”

    Utter rot! How are you supposed to do that towing a van? Not to mention truck drivers.

    Perhaps better combination mirrors are required but definitely not full convex mirrors on both sides.

  54. “No evidence to show Covex mirrors are problematic” ?
    Thats plane insane with objects appearing further back than they really are I have experienced numerous near misses when lane changing Convex mirrors need to be outlawed as they are extremely dangerous.

    I have been driving for 40 years as a rep and without incident but I must replace these dangerous mirrors asap.

  55. Although convex mirrors are using in variety of ways, and at the same time convex mirrors provide safety during driving and minimizes the mishaps and prevent road accidents.

  56. Just because they use them in EU, not all that glitters is gold, I drive a work car with them, a Toyota Prius, great car but for the mirrors. It has the worst of the “modern” split field, there is a notecible delay as you have to focus on them, my 1992 Peugeot 205 has flat “planar” mirrors. Just because it is a European car, to compy with the ADR’s (of the time) to be able to be sold in Australia, it had to have L & R flat, planar mirrors. And they work well. The blind spots on the Toyota may seem to justify convex mirrors, until you change lanes and almost tear the fronto off an ajoining car.I couldn’t care less if they use convex mirrors in the EU – it doesn’t mean that what is practiced over there is ideal. Certainly, if I ever buy a new car, the 1st alteration will be to the mirrors.

    Reply ↓
    Shaun McGowan on January 18, 2010 at 12:06 am said:
    I believe the average car driver is not experienced and intelligent enough to use convex mirrors, do not trust your lives with these side mirrors.

    Reply ↓
    Ray on January 19, 2010 at 4:40 pm said:
    Hullo Ann,
    any glazier anywhere can do it, the glass they use is plain mirror glass.
    You might have to give the glazier a template you cut yourself with some stiffish paper placed over the existing mirror, outline it with a pen, cut with scissors and test the shape to see if it fits neatly.

    Reply ↓
    Dino on February 2, 2010 at 3:23 pm said:
    I think these are a disaster and make it difficult to judge the distance. At night and in the rain at night they are even more difficult to use. They may be OK for people who do not wear glasses. I have a 3 year old car which has these and I am still not comfortable. The only way is to double check by looking over the shoulder or in the internal mirror. Why be distracted by take your eyes off the road in front to look over your shoulder? Why force a double check?
    Looking in mirrors should be VERY simple. You should not have to recompute the distance.
    BTW, I asked about changing the glass at the beginning and was told it was not allowed.

    Reply ↓
    Elizabeth on February 2, 2010 at 8:52 pm said:
    I have to agree 100% with Shaun McGowan about the general level of intelligence of most car drivers not to be trusted with convex mirrors. There definately should be warning for those renting vehicles. It only takes once quick incidence to result in tragedy.

    Reply ↓
    David on February 2, 2010 at 9:09 pm said:
    Convex mirrors are a huge problem for the inexperienced driver who believe that what they see in the mirror is reality! How often has a car cut in front in lanes creating a near miss situation or heavy braking all because they thought the car in the other lane was further away!
    It is an absolute rarity to actually see some look over their shoulder! P platers especially don’t seem to have shoulders. This also seems to be the case for older drivers with arthritis or stiff necks!!

    Reply ↓
    Melissa on February 4, 2010 at 3:12 pm said:
    Convex mirrors can be a little strange at first when you first use them, but given time you’ll find you can’t go without them. That’s why so many cars are now fitted with them, the benefits of them are obvious.

    Regards,
    Melissa

    Reply ↓
    DD on February 5, 2010 at 7:02 pm said:
    I think these convex mirrors distort the image you are viewing so much so, it makes my head spin. I was test-driving a new vehicle yesterday which was fitted with these ridiculous mirrors and they upset me so much I terminated my test drive. I have been driving for 20 plus years and have never been involved in an accident, so I don’t think my intelligence and ability to drive properly come into question. I think it is simply that I felt terribly uncomfortable relying on these mirrors in order to determine safety in an expensive new car I have not yet purchased!! It almost felt like I was at the Ekka looking into one of those other “silly” mirrors that give out distorted imagery. I have since decided I will not be purchasing this vehicle or any other vehicle that any manufacturers deem necessary to be fitted with this type of circus mirror. No wonder there are so many accidents on the road that are caused by simple miscalculation. If this keeps up, there will be many more to come. I don’t want to be one of the victims. Do you?

    Reply ↓
    DD on February 5, 2010 at 7:06 pm said:
    For those who think convex mirrors are the go….Just because you can use a convex mirror safely, doesn’t mean the person in the lane next to you can. Half the time is isn’t your own driving you need to be concerned with, it’s the other noong noongs on the road!! When it comes to convex mirrors on cars, I could well be one of the noong noongs!!

    Reply ↓
    Tania on February 11, 2010 at 1:28 am said:
    My new Honda Civic has what you call convex mirrors. All I know is that my other car stated that “things may appear further that they are” on the left side, and the right hand side has nothing stated on the mirror, meaning normal view, so this is what I was used to.

    I didn’t even notice that my new Honda was any different, (as it doesn’t say that the view is different), until I reversed into a tree which looked like it was quite some distance away. I also refuse to parallel park in it at all.

    Does anyone know if it is law, that you should at least be advised when the view is different??????

    Reply ↓
    PC on February 22, 2010 at 2:38 pm said:
    They are extremely hard to judge distance, serve no practical function at all and should be banned. A backwards step in raod safety.

    Reply ↓
    Uday Shastri on March 10, 2010 at 3:50 pm said:
    Convex mirrors are extremely good on passenger side. I find that it eliminates the blindspot. After I identify the closest vechile in the mirror, I look at rear view mirror to check the distance of the same vechile before changing the lane and it works really well.

    I have an older car with flat mirror on the passenger side and I find it hardly of any use since the coverage is very little.

    All thumbs up for Convex mirrors.

    Thanks

    Reply ↓
    Bruce Grime on March 11, 2010 at 4:08 pm said:
    why cannot the manufacturers give you a choice so you can pick plain or convex mirror. I have used both and find that it takes me a little while to get used to a convex mirror – about 15 minutes. give people the choice then the problem disappears.
    a greater safety concern to me is that we cannot have mirrors on the passenger side on the front wing of the car. my early cars were sports cars that had them on the wings both left and right side. it means you don’t have to turn your head much to look at the mirrors to see what is behind you and therefore less risk of something happening in front of you when you are looking to the side. as for these people who odvocate looking over your shoulder while driving at [any] speed – don’t you realise how dangerous that is? looking over your shoulder should be for starting out from a parking spot only.

    Reply ↓
    Graham on March 11, 2010 at 4:23 pm said:
    Our MA Mondeo has the best of both worlds as it combines both flat and convex, but the real issue is that modern cars have woefull rear vision so we need to rely on the mirrors. The Mondeo has poor rear vision so you need a decent mirror, thank heavens they are OK.

    I drove a few other cars being making our choice, and it seems that there is also a great variation in the amount of curvatore in each mirror depending on the model/ manufacturer. One Japanese Model made my wife feel nauseous and the Dealer actually agreed that they do with some people.

    Not at all consistent and not very safety oriented.

    Check Google there is a supplier in Sydney of replacment mirrors that I understand is on the books of more than one Dealership.

    Reply ↓
    GWWitchard on March 11, 2010 at 4:54 pm said:
    Motorcycles have had convex mirrors for years (well, most of them, anyway!). They give a much wider field of view, but nothing- I’ll say that again- NOTHING- takes the place of a “headcheck!”. The headcheck has been part of motorcycle training since I first become an instructor in 1991, and was always strictly enforced on the training range. Pity car drivers were not subject to a similar off road training system. Might nake the roads safer for us motorcyclists, too.

    Reply ↓
    Phil Thompson on March 11, 2010 at 7:42 pm said:
    I cannot believe the amount of people on here that don’t look over their shoulder before changing lanes. This is not a new thing. I have held my licence for about 15 years now, and was taught this from day 1 – Mirror, Indicator, Shoulder (MIS). In those 15 years of driving I have never had an accident, or near miss from taking my eyes off the road for about a second to look over my shoulder. I have, however noticed many vehicles in my blindspot, thus avoiding an accident or cutting them off. Maybe this explains why I am cut off by so many people on the road. Have some situational awareness people!

    Reply ↓
    Wayne (Tamworth) on March 12, 2010 at 8:23 am said:
    Regarding the comments re not taking your eyes off the road for anything- scanning, or moving your eyes, is a preferred safe driving method. This includes- both sides of the road well ahead; instruments (all of them!); mirrors; and looking as far ahead as possible. Of course, this can not be done safely if you are using your phone, eating or fighting with the kids in the back seat.
    I would like to see positive work done to target the REAL causes of accidents- not just a catch cry (eg. speed kills) that circumvents the truth and is used to justify a new tax.
    By the way- why are counrty drivers being slugged a new tax on our rego to fix the city ratrace when our own roads are in such a mess???

    Reply ↓
    Alison on March 12, 2010 at 10:48 am said:
    Just bought a “new” car with convex mirrors & find they give an unreal distance perspective. After only driving for 2 days with these I am considering changing them to regular mirrors. I am doing driver training with my 17yr old, (have done 60+ hours in the old car) who said that he couldn’t work out how far cars were from us. His comment is, “I will use the rear vision and turn my head to get better judgement, I don’t want to have an accident”.

    Reply ↓
    Graham on March 12, 2010 at 1:12 pm said:
    I cannot believe the number of drivers who do NOT do the “headcheck” required by LAW.
    I am approaching 70 and have no trouble obeying this LAW. When I find I am unable to do the headcheck I will consider that I am no longer fit to hold a licence and hand it in.
    I am also amazed by the number of people who rely on their mirrors to judge distances. This is folly in the extreme.
    Rear view mirrors are there so that drivers can have an idea of what is happening around them. In this regard I find the mildly convex mirrors far preferable to the old fashioned flat mirrors which left most of “what was around you” in a blind spot.

    Reply ↓
    Bruce Willan on March 18, 2010 at 12:47 pm said:
    I done it, I have put unleaded petrol into my diesel Range Rover. It is a bad thing for sure and I did not think it could possible happen to me. I have done 50000 ks in last 8 months so I am refuelling regularly, got distracted after a long day and picked up the wrong nossel (the one beside the diesel). Vehicle under repair not sure what damage has been done , vehicle was not driven but ignition turned on. Thought I was the only special one but two other vehicles in on the same day same problem. With the growing number of diesel arriving on our roads it is only going to get worse.

    Reply ↓
    side view car mirrors on April 11, 2010 at 7:30 pm said:
    Convex mirror are really helpful to get refelction from larger distance. But, while driving heavy vehicles it is necessary to adjust truck convex mirror to avoid blind spot.

    Reply ↓
    Rick Forbes on May 15, 2010 at 6:21 pm said:
    New Ford Fiesta WS. Bloody ridiculous convex mirror. In America Ford have an inset in the drivers mirror which shows the true distance. Now that makes sense. Anyone found a magnifying type plastic layer that will easily attach to all or a portion of the drivers mirror and correct this dangerous situation. That may be an easy fix?

    Reply ↓
    Frank Aquino on June 30, 2010 at 1:13 pm said:
    Convex side mirriors are the most loopy idea to come out of the motoring industry, ever. They serve no purpose whatsoever, unless you call increasing hazards a purpose. What? But…but…they tell you if there’s a car behind and to the side of you, don’t they? Well for heaven’s sake – there’s ALWAYS a car behind and to the side of you! What you need to know is how close it is! The convex mirror tells you the other car is way back there, way out of range, whereas in reality its right on your bumper. I defy anyone to accurately estimate distances with a convex mirror. It simply cannot be done, because our brains haven’t evolved that way.
    What an idiotic idea! What’s next? Spherical lens windscreens for a fish-eye view of the road ahead?

    Reply ↓
    Bob Taylor on July 29, 2010 at 9:09 pm said:
    Convex side mirrors are nightmare when backing a large boat you need to know the correst distance.Also dangerour at 100k in heavy traffic when its dark and raining taking your eyes off the road to look over shoulder is not the safest thing to do.

    Reply ↓
    mick on August 18, 2010 at 3:06 pm said:
    this is for Dirk, somewhere up in the forum. Der! Did you think a car dealer can tell you about every thing before your holliness takes it out on a drive? And a message for all of you out there whinging about mirrors and stuff! A good driver doesn’t even need a side view mirror on the near side and pretty much not even the off side one if you know how to use your main one and look over your shoulder

    Reply ↓
    Rick Forbes on September 16, 2010 at 7:39 pm said:
    Dear Dirk…..You obviously don’t drive a Ford Fiesta WS coupe! Look over your shoulder and all you see is pillars. If anyone knows of a source for stick on normal mirrors for this vehicle would you mind posting? I’d need to get them posted as I live at Port Douglas QLD.

    Reply ↓
    PETER OAKEY on October 4, 2010 at 12:41 pm said:
    MY WIFE PURCHASED A 2010 GETZ ABOUT SIX MONTHS AGO, I HAVE BEEN A PASSANGER MANY TIMES AND HAVE BEEN VERY CRITICAL OF HER HESITANT DRIVING, LAST SATURDAY I DROVE THE CAR FOR THE 1ST TIME, WENT TO REVERSE PARK USING THE SIDE MIRRORS AND NEARLY HIT THE CAR BEHIND.

    DRIVING HOME I WAS QUITE DISMAYED AND FRUSTRATED AT THE DISTANCE SHOWN V TRUE DISTANCE OF UPCOMING TRAFFIC.

    UNTILL I RETIRED A FEW YEARS BACK I WAS ON THE ROAD AS A REP, NONE OF THE CARS I DROVE HAD SUCH DISTORDED SIDE MIRRORS. MY WIFE GOT MY MOST HUMBLE APOLOGIES, HYUNDIA GOT A SERVE.

    MY VECHILE IS A 17FT TRITON 4X4 WITH THE BEST CONVEXE MIRRORS I HAVE EVERY USED .
    RGDS PETER

    Reply ↓
    Tanya Scott on October 4, 2010 at 9:57 pm said:
    I have driven many different types of vehicles including heavy rigid ones in my 50 years of having a licence. I have used several types of mirrors – flat, convex, and those with a small convex part to them (these are probably the most useful.) I have found that with spectacles, particularly multifocus lenses, looking at the convex mirror takes a couple of seconds for my eyes to adjust to the different perspective. Apart from the unreal distance problem, this time factor I find is very dangerous as objects are quite out of focus for a short time until my eyes become adjusted to the difference in reality. I cannot see the point in these mirrors at all, as they slow the decision-making ability of the driver down quite considerably. I look in the mirror, then in the internal one and then for good measure over the shoulder. It has simply added another action to passing a vehicle which adds to the danger of driving. I do not even like left hand convex mirrors, but driver’s side ones are really dangerous. At least with flat mirrors you know the distance the following car is from you. Distorted reality at 100 kph is insane.

    Reply ↓
    Tony on October 5, 2010 at 9:17 am said:
    With 38 yrs of driving and motor cycle riding, if this went to a vote I would vote against these convex mirrors. I’d rather have plain mirrors and look over my shoulder. On a motor cycle you do not have side pillars to block your view when you turn your head to confirm your field of view, and you do not reverse park a motor cycle using your mirrors. All drivers contributing to this forum are obviously concerned enough about safe driving to state their view. If you are comfortable with them and consider them safe, that’s fine. But if not, you should have the option to choose or customise to suit.

    Reply ↓
    Anonymous on October 24, 2010 at 9:28 pm said:
    convex side mirrors are crap

    Reply ↓
    neil on October 26, 2010 at 2:57 am said:
    regarding convex mirrors on cars i have just brought a new car and i was not told about these mirrors at first i thought my eyes were playing tricks on me as the cars that were following me apeared to be some distance away but in actuall fact they were much closer i fail to see were they are safe as they give false distance imformation to the driver i belive they are unsafe and a step in the wrong direction.

    Reply ↓
    G A Cope DSA, ADI on November 2, 2010 at 6:57 pm said:
    I am a Driving Instructor in the UK. Convex mirrors in my opinion are dangerous. They give a false image and i beleive they cause more accidents than flat glass mirrors. The solution is very simple we need more mirrors. Three mirrors are the optimum amount on each door, all made of flat glass to give a true impression of what you see. All these mirrors should be adjustable. The first mirror should be used to se traffic lanes on either side of the vehicle, The second mirror should be used to see in your blind spot areas, And the third mirror should be used to see the kerb edging on one side and Parking bay lines on both sides. SIMPLE.

    Reply ↓
    John Adams on November 11, 2010 at 10:13 am said:
    Bought a Getz 3-door 18 months ago. Passenger side rear view mirror is an electric type convex mirror with a curved surface. Last week, while being driven along Parramatta Road, the mirror exploded. Mirror glass disappeared and there is what appears to be a carbon deposit around the inside front of the containing cone of the mirror. No dents to front of the containing cone.
    Is this unusual ? Electrical fault ?

    Reply ↓
    M Flood on November 18, 2010 at 2:12 am said:
    I recently bought a VW Polo and have had a truly aggravating time adjusting to the convex mirror. The blind spots in the car are significant, therefore you cannot rely on turning your head to see what is coming up behind as the view is blocked by the body of the car. This makes the convex mirror essential but it gives an entirely false impression of the nearness of a vehicle behind. I am concerned about this situation as there seems to be no way around the problem except buying another car with less severe blind spots.

    Reply ↓
    vince baker on January 7, 2011 at 5:56 pm said:
    I find many cars cutting other vehicles off during lane changes. I have observed that cars fitted with curved mirrors are usually the worst offenders as the drivers do not have the correct depth perception due to the cureved mirror giving them a false view as to the position of the car alongside. I do not like using these mirrors especially when reversing trailers. It is much safer using flat mirrors. If I purchase a new vehicle I will make sure that these mirrors are not fitted. I drive a van with limited left side visibility but if you give the other drivers enough warning of lane change intentions then it is not a problem if you have a blind spot which is an issue with most vans and trucks. Whenever I get cutoff by other road users with curved mirrors I make sure with the use of my airhorns that they get the message that they cut me off.

    Reply ↓
    Sue on January 9, 2011 at 3:16 am said:
    I have a 2008 Elantra which has convex mirrors on both sides. Although there was no warning printed on them I realised pretty early on that they were convex. I just use my rear vision mirror when I want to know the exact distance of the car behind me or coming up in the next lane.

    Reply ↓
    Sandra on January 27, 2011 at 5:21 pm said:
    What surprises me most about about the knockers of convex mirrors is that they seem to have missed the point. Convex mirrors eliminate the blind spot. I have a stick on convex mirror and I love it. Before I got it, I was horrified when I consciously measured the time a passing car was in the blind spot before it appeared out of nowhere. I always (now and before the stick on mirror) look over my shoulder. The problem is that there is a huge pillar which obscures my view. Now, after a few days of studying the distortion – by using my rearview mirror as a guide, I feel like I really know what’s going on around me. Having said that, I would much prefer the 60% flat and 40% convex, which seems to offer the best of both worlds. Does anyone know where I can get one?

    Reply ↓
    SP on January 28, 2011 at 9:49 pm said:
    All cars I’ve ever owned have had flat drivers side mirrors. I drove a new Lancer with a convex drivers mirror and it was ridiculous. Quick glances in the side mirror before a head turn to change lanes were near useless in determaining car positioning, and at some angles two images of cars would be visable at certain distances. In answer to the question, I believe more dangerous, and after 6 months I still can’t get used to it. I can understand convex mirrors on the passenger side to widen the angle, but unnecessary on the drivers side. Will be looking into replacing it with a flat (normal) mirror.

    Reply ↓
    Phillip on February 23, 2011 at 12:10 am said:
    Re: “The “head check” is necessary to ensure it is safe to change lanes – drivers should not depend on their mirrors alone.”

    Utter rot! How are you supposed to do that towing a van? Not to mention truck drivers.

    Perhaps better combination mirrors are required but definitely not full convex mirrors on both sides.

    Reply ↓
    Bill on September 21, 2011 at 1:30 pm said:
    “No evidence to show Covex mirrors are problematic” ?
    Thats plane insane with objects appearing further back than they really are I have experienced numerous near misses when lane changing Convex mirrors need to be outlawed as they are extremely dangerous.

    I have been driving for 40 years as a rep and without incident but I must replace these dangerous mirrors asap.

    Reply ↓
    Convex Mirror on September 28, 2011 at 5:12 pm said:
    Although convex mirrors are using in variety of ways, and at the same time convex mirrors provide safety during driving and minimizes the mishaps and prevent road accidents.

    Reply ↓

  57. I’ve found the convex mirrors are better on my 1970s car with the 4″ small original mirrors.

    However I always check in the interior mirror first, then the side mirror then signal and then do the head check.

    I don’t understand why people aren’t advised to always do the interior mirror check first – it eliminates the possibility of cars “coming out of nowhere”.

    Also the side mirrors (flat or convex) should be properly set (usually turned further out until you just miss seeing the side of your own car by an inch or two).

    Ideally an overtaking car behind you disappears off the right of the interior mirror at the same time it begins to appear in your side mirror.

  58. yea this is not the smartest thing invented outright dangerous when trying to reverse a trailer or lane change with trailer on everything looks further away and in reality it is level with you , another example where car manufactures do not listen to there users. i wonder if we could claim for damages when we run into things ??????

  59. Ok, weighing up the benefits to weaknesses, convex mirrors lose. The following reasons are why
    1. I drive a fair few different hire cars for work. Each car has a different combination of convex mirrors. It takes me approx 15-30 mins to get used to them, and even then I might subconsciously slip back into expecting what Im used to. I personally dont like being dangerous on the road, even for 15 minutes.

    2. Everyone is talking about changing lanes. This is the least problematic aspect of them. The real danger comes when you are pulling out into moving traffic from a car park or stationary lane of traffic. You cant use your central mirror and you NEED to judge distance. I find this especially sucks at night when I cant judge distance at all and I just need to wait till there is no traffic – this can take some time.

    3. I have seen two VERY near misses and one accident in the last year where people have pulled out in front of a car moving at speed. Its possible that they may simply just not seen them, but I think its more likely they misjudged distance because of the mirrors.

    4. Others have made the points – its irrelevant if you are ok with these mirrors. There are people who are not ok with them, as so this makes them dangerous.

    5. The seriousness of an accident from not seeing a car in a blind spot is significantly lower than cutting someone off because of misjudged distance.

    6. It teaches drivers to be lazy and not carry out a head check. Even with the convex mirrors, there is often still a small blind spot.

    THE SOLUTION
    - I think the main problem is Australia is that we have a random mix of cars who use them for both mirrors, one mirror or none. This makes people notice, because it forces people to use something they are not used to. They need to make it standard. I think convex on the passenger side, flat on the drivers side is a workable compromise.
    - Alternatively, manufacturers need to give people the choice of the mirros they want. This is not the best solution, as there are a lot of second hand cars and hire cars around.
    - There needs to be an easily accessible service for people to change them if they dont want them. This needs to be promoted so that people know there is an alternative.
    - Some studies and data from the TAC would be nice. I would be suprised if there were not a significant number of accidents caused by them. Two people in the comments have already said they have had an accident. Can they provide data as to how many side swipes they have prevented?

    PS – I would like to point out INTELLIGENCE HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH IT.

  60. I just picked up a 2012 Toyota Corolla with convex driver’s mirror with two zones. My dad (30 years driving experience, zero accidents) and I ( 10 years, zero accidents) both feel like throwing up every time we look at the mirror. Put simply this is the worst decision in motoring in this last decade. They spend billions on air bags, ESC, EBFD, crumple zones, passenger zone strengthening, and ignore that the number 1 cause of accidents is driver error. So what do they do? Add another source of driver error. Toyota says no choice, I gotta have it. No Mr Toyota, I don’t. I will sell this car I now hate, and never buy one from you ever again. What needs to happen is for a class action against the manufacturers by people involved in accidents due to misjudgments of distances from these diabolical things.

  61. If some people are happy with their curved mirrors that’s ok, but I do not like them. As an old building worker and handyman I consider myself a pretty good judge of distance (whether something will span a gap or fit through a doorway) and I use that learned skill in driving. I suppose I could get used to curved mirrors if there was a standard of how much curvature they have, but my family has several cars, they all seem to be different. Even on one car the left and right mirrors are different ! So if I buy a new car (for my own use) I get them changed to flat. If I am breaching some design rule then so be it, but I have not had a collision accident in 30 years.

  62. Anything that distorts the reality in vision is dangerous while driving, particular at speed an multiple lane highways. We automatically react to what we see and while driving that could mean an immediate response without time to redefine variations – we also have other vision impediments to assess such as speed and possible heavy rain, fog, snow, mist, smoke, heat haze, passing shadows, variable street lighting, darkness and movement of other things. We need to maintain the best circumstances and response information while driving to ensure we have immediacy of actual data and information. For those driving with prescription glasses/sunglasses there is another issue. I regard them as a hazard and always revert to rear vision mirror to ensure I have read distances correctly, particularly after overtaking so I do not cut in too quickly.

  63. The concensus here seems to be that at the very least people should have a choice of whether these these are fitted to their cars. Yet the manufacturers do not offer this choice, so i am left to look for an aftermarket solution. To date i cannot find anyone in Melbourne that sells an aftermarket replacement for a 2011 Toyota Corolla. If anyone has managed to get one, can you post contact details?

  64. new recycle &garbage truck from england have covex mirrors both sides. they should not be allowed as they don’t give a ture depth so reversing is a nightmare. one large flat mirror & one small convex mirror is all that is needed I have tried both & this combunation gives the most conferdence.I drive a recycle truck & I need a true idea where kids are in courts.

  65. can someone please tell me where I can go to get these awful convex
    mirrors replaced, I am in the merrylands area sydney nsw,and have already
    had two near misses. Gratefull Ian!

  66. I find very dangerous if you can’t see out the back
    With your rear view mirror
    Example utes with full canopy trucks caravans( no u need different mirrors ) but example my new triton has both mirrors done or should say did until had them both changed
    Hint Americans drive different side of road to us

  67. Any glazer can change these mirrors
    Approx $25 each side
    Hade them done today same price five years ago

  68. I am having double vision with my convex mirror. I see 2 cars coming and then merging into 1 as it appeared just behind my car. What is happening here?

  69. Yesterday took delivery of a 2013 Impreza – 1st time in an auto for more than 20 years. Combination of new car, auto, stop/start engine, cancave mirrors and rain. Within 10 minutes of leaving dealership I backed into a concrete road divider – how? – the bloody mirrors showed it being well clear of the rear of the car!.

    Getting car repaired and fitted with new PLAIN wingmirror glass. By the way, I’ve been driving manuals sine 1966 and NEVER backed into anything before!

  70. I have a 2013 Subaru Forester with convex side mirrors & I hate them intensely.
    Reversing into my garage takes several attempts because I have to keep looking over my shoulder. The convex mirrors make it extremely difficult to judge distance & after 6 months I still just cannot get it. My previous Mitsuibishi Challenger (a large vehicle) was easy, I could do it in one go. You never see full convex side mirrors on trucks because you need to judge distance when reversing & convex mirrors just don’t work. I want my flat glass back.

  71. I now have a Kia Grand Carnival which I knew was going to be difficult given its length but moreso due to both external mirrors being convex. I’ve nearly chopped off a number of vehicles to my right. I have looked up the Aust. standard and it says “External Rear Vision Mirrors 14.2.3.1. Driver’s Side 14.2.3.1.1. Field of View – A flat external mirror shall be installed…” So how can any vehicle sold in Aust have a convex drivers side external mirror?

  72. I struggle to comprehend the difficulty people are having with convex mirrors.
    I have an older car I’m doing up and working very hard to try and source, cut and fit convex mirrors to suit said car that never came with them. The field of view from a flat glass mirror is not nearly enough to be safe, especially on the passenger side.

    I must say, the best implementation I’ve seen are where the majority of the panel is close to flat mirror, with an outer 1/3rd being a very wide convex – a great compromise.

    I expect users that are struggling with convex mirrors are not using them properly, perhaps only checking when they are about to make a hasty traffic move with no forethought. When you are about to merge at the end of that overtaking lane, you can’t tell me you only just looked at the end?! You should have been using your collection of mirrors to know at all times where cars are and the speed they are travelling.

    Just to throw one more grenade into the conversation, I don’t know why the centre rear view isn’t *slightly* convexed. Nearly every car I’ve driven, I find the centre mirror doesn’t capture enough of the rear window. Maybe I’m tall and need to sit further back, but either way, I’d adopt some improvement here too!

  73. these mirrors are very dangerous as the only view that matters is the real view. Many accidents can be caused by not seeing following traffic as it really is and cutting into the other lane thinking it is safe to do so. Change the mirror requirements

  74. i was reversing a trailer and hit the object that appeared miles away. they are dangerous. I can now no longer reverse park properly as I cannot judge the distance correctly. also I have trouble reversing up to trailers to hitch them up, I have to get out and check now. I have not had problems in twenty years of driving till now.

  75. Just bought a new car with convex mirrors and I hate them too. I keep cutting people off. It’s very dangerous. I feel sick driving it as I’m too scared to change lanes. How many accidents have they already caused? No-one would know that for certain. I thought it was my old age – but it’s not. Going back to the dealer today to complain. I have nearly caused about 5 accidents that I know of. I apologize to all those people out there that I have cut off in the last month or so .. very sorry!
    Tina

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