Road rules in shopping centres

Road rules don’t only cover the roads we drive on – they also cover road related areas that are open to or used by the public for driving, riding or parking and this includes shopping centres.

Consequently these road related areas are covered by parking, speed limit, overtaking and signage rules.

It also means you can be penalised for breaking them. For example, driving over the speed limit could result in being fined and losing demerit points. So, if you are doing 40km/h in a 20km/h zone, you will be eligible for a $197 fine and the loss of 3 demerit points.

You will also be penalised accordingly for not giving way where appropriate, for double-parking and for driving against the direction indicated on a one-way sign.

Shopping centres can enforce parking infringements, however all other rules must be enforced by the police.

View Rule 13 from Road Rules 2008 for more information.

What do you think of driver behaviour in shopping centre car parks? Should there be stronger enforcement of the road rules in ‘road related areas’ like car parks?

13 thoughts on “Road rules in shopping centres

  1. Car parks should be design to reduce the Carbon footprint. reduce the time the cars are operating using fuel particularly in undergroud and high righ carparks.

  2. the police should patrol parking,in shopping malls/centres,by being visiual,too, people tend to be a little more polite, to each other,and it might slow down the hoons and they might move somewhere else,and leave the general comminuity alone

  3. Police need to patrol shopping centre carparks especially when it was observed recently a young driver give way to a disabled driver reversing from the parking spot, only to park in the disabled parking only, without a permit. There are also a lot of incidences of cars speeding through car parks.

  4. Just a little confused about the shopping centre enforcement of parking infringements. Does this mean that they can issue infringement notices and collect fines (private revenue), or is this still the preserve of the police (state revenue). I’m not saying that dangerous practices of illegal parking should be over looked… but over zealous enforcement by essentially private companies to earn additional revenue just leaves me with a poor taste in the mouth.

  5. I just have to ask a couple of questions about car parks.

    Generally speaking, what is the most common thing to use a car park? You may well say “cars”. But, you’re wrong. Each car going into a car park has a minimum of 1 person in it. So cars & people are equal? No. Lots of the cars have many more. Lots of those people are small children. Small children have no real sense of danger around them.

    Driver’s, which includes the people who were just pedestrians in that car park, must consider other people and drive accordingly. Can anyone tell me, where the safest carpark in NSW is; i.e. one without any collisions or injuries this year?

    Do the car parks really need to be policed more? Can the driver’s of those cars take more responsibility & care in the way they drive? When you drive in there with your mind on what your going to buy, do you consider how many other people are doing the same? Great recipe for a crash. Damn those vegies were expensive. Good luck people. Drive carefully.

  6. why do not people put their headlights “on” in multi-level car parks?

    Lights also help other people see you coming.

  7. In response to David – I sometimes forget to put my lights on in car parks, I think this is becaus they are lit. Usually when you get on to the dark/unlit road you realise that your lights arnt on!

  8. How do you know which parts of large shopping centre car parks are “road related areas?” and which are not. Recently fined by police for parking where everyone ALWAYS parks when a grossly undersized car park is full – it does not block traffic at all. Assumed it was private property and that Westfield let people park there because they knew they were desperately short of space. How does one tell where the shopping centre jurisdiction ends and the police patrolled area begins – do the police even know where the dividing line is? I rang Wyong NSW police and they didn’t know the answer in this case – come on! This must present all sorts of problems when accidents occur and no one knows clearly which side of this “imaginary” line on the ground the event is on.

    How about the NRMA taking this up as a cause and getting something clear out to the public. How about a rule that no-one except the police are allowed to put up the standard vertically oriented rectangular signs. All private area parking signs must be of another type. It will have to come from the NRMA – NSW police not known for insight or inventive genius now are they.

  9. Parking violations in shopping centre carparks? Oh no, I might get a ticket for parking in a ‘Hybrid Only’ or ‘Parents With Prams’ zone!

    Those restrictions are a joke, and are treated as thus. I doubt one infringement notice has ever been issued. The NRMA is obviously trying not to draw out attention to this by including the parking rates and fines for loss of parking ticket in the ‘parking violations’ category.

  10. Parking violations in shopping centre carparks? Oh no, I might get a ticket for parking in a ‘Hybrid Only’ or ‘Parents With Prams’ zone!

    Those restrictions are a joke, and should be treated as thus. I doubt one infringement notice has ever been issued. The NRMA is obviously trying not to draw out attention to this by including the parking rates and fines for loss of parking ticket in the ‘parking violations’ category. Park without fear, people.

  11. Obey the rules and you won’t have a problem.
    Show some respect and consideration for other road users leave the “Seniors” spots for seniors and “Parents with Prams” for parents who actually have children in prams.
    It’s not rocket science, make life easy for the Police and they will give us an easy time.
    Sounds pretty simple to me.

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